Question:

Who are the National Association of Mortgage Brokers (NAMB)?

Answer:

The National Association of Mortgage Brokers (NAMB) was established in 1973 and is the only national trade organization of Mortgage Brokers. It has 50 state affiliates, more than 25 000 members, and promotes the mortgage industry with educational programs and professional certification.

The National Association of Mortgage Brokers (NAMB) reports more than 55,000 mortgage brokerage businesses with more than 420,000 employees, originating more than half of US home loans. Ten federal laws, five federal enforcement bodies and more than 50 state laws regulate the mortgage broker industry.

The National Association of Mortgage Brokers (NAMB) Certification Exams

The NAMB GMA®, CRMS®, and CMC® certification exams provide NAMB members with distinct opportunity to become more competitive in the field of mortgage brokering.

What are the benefits of getting certified with the National Association of Mortgage Brokers (NAMB)?

Getting certified with NAMB allows you to earn more than uncertified brokers; borrowers are ensured of your impeccable high quality service; achieve greater professional growth. Beside all that, being certified with the National Association of Mortgage Brokers (NAMB) gets you listed online as a NAMB certified mortgage professional.

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